Agency Guide

This guide answers the most common questions agencies have about Government ICT Common Capabilities. Further information about ICT Functional Leadership can be found on the Governance and Leadership pages and information about working with the GCIO is found on this page. Specific information about government’s ICT strategy is found in the Government Strategy and supporting work programme. Alternatively, contact gcio@dia.govt.nz for any additional questions not covered here.

  1. What are Government ICT Common Capabilities?
  2. What are the benefits of Government ICT Common Capabilities?
  3. Are Government Agencies required to adopt ICT Common Capabilities?
  4. Which agencies are covered under ICT Functional Leadership Mandate?
  5. Can agencies get an exemption from implementing an ICT Common Capability?
  6. How do ICT Common Capabilities get prioritised?
  7. What do agencies do if they need something that isn’t an ICT Common Capability?
  8. How do agencies find out what ICT Common Capabilities will be developed in the near future?
  9. What happens if an agency needs something urgently that is in the pipeline?
  10. How can agencies get involved in an ICT Common Capability project?
  11. Can any agency lead an ICT Common Capability project?
  12. How can my agency contribute to future ICT Common Capabilities?
  13. What is the secondary procurement process?
  14. How do agencies get started using an ICT Common Capability?
  15. What is the service fee?
  16. What transition support will my agency get when we take up an ICT Common Capability?
  17. How do agencies get their preferred supplier on an ICT Common Capabilities panel?
  18. What happens when contracts are renewed/renegotiated and the supplier agencies may be using for an ICT Common Capability isn’t extended/renewed?
  19. Why does it take so long to develop a common capability?

 

 1 What are Government ICT Common Capabilities?

An ICT Common Capability is any technology that could be used by more than one agency, or across the whole of government, to support the delivery of business outcomes.

Government agencies collaborate to develop these capabilities and the lead agency takes responsibility for procurement and contract maintenance on behalf of all agencies.

The Government Strategy and supporting work programme sets the direction for all  ICT Common Capabilities.

The ICT Common Capabilities developed for all-of-government use are detailed on the Products and Services pages in the ‘Available now’ section. There are also several capabilities in the process of design or procurement. These are described in the same section on the ‘Coming soon’ section

 

 2. What are the benefits of Government ICT Common Capabilities?

Government ICT Common Capabilities allow agencies to share ICT investment and pool resources. This reduces duplicated investments and leads to shared ICT costs across the system. Sharing scarce resources across the system also helps individual agencies run efficient ICT systems and releases their resources to focus on creating better public services, instead of maintaining many versions of similar technology across multiple agencies.

Going to market to procure ICT is very expensive for us and the market.  It takes time and effort. Common Capabilities are procured once for the benefit of all agencies leading to lower costs overall.

Working closer together, realising information as an asset and enabling a citizen centric approach to government services requires agencies to work from the same standards and have a common level of security. Common Capabilities allows agencies to move from varying levels of standards to a shared set of standards that allows agencies to achieve their goals for better public services.

 

3. Are government agencies required to adopt ICT Common Capabilities?

There are four mandatory ICT Common Capabilities:

Agencies within the scope of the ICT Functional Leadership mandate are expected to adopt these mandatory ICT Common Capabilities at the earliest opportunity within their asset management lifecycles. They are also expected to adopt all other non-mandated ICT Common Capabilities developed for government use as soon as practible.

Agencies within the scope of the ICT Functional Leadership mandate who submit Four Year Plans to Treasury each year, are required to outline their plans to adopt ICT Common Capabilities.

In addition, when the GCIO considers investment cases, a key criteria that will be considered is the use of ICT Common Capabilities.

Government agencies outside the ICT Functional Leadership mandate are expected to adopt ICT Common Capabilities which fit their strategies and/or provide a commercial benefit.  

All agencies in the Public Sector are eligible to consume ICT Common Capabilities. This includes Local Authorities.

Many agencies in the State services are using one or more ICT Common Capabilities. These agencies are listed on the Products and Services pages on this site.  For more information please contact gcio@dia.govt.nz

 

 4.  Which agencies are covered under the ICT Functional Leadership mandate?

The ICT Functional Leadership mandate applies to the 28 Public Service departments and four Non-Public Service departments outlined on the State Services Commission website. It also applies to all District Health Boards and the following Crown Entities:

  • Accident Compensation Corporation
  • Earthquake Commission
  • Housing New Zealand Corporation
  • New Zealand Qualifications Authority
  • New Zealand Trade and Enterprise
  • New Zealand Transport Agency
  • Tertiary Education Commission

 

5.   Can agencies get an exemption from implementing an ICT Common Capability?

Government agencies covered by the ICT Functional Leadership mandate are expected to adopt the ICT Common Capabilities when their investment cycles permit.  In some cases, agency-specific requirements may mean existing ICT Common Capabilities are not suitable. If this is the case, the agency Chief Executive will need to apply to the GCIO for an exemption. This exemption must be in writing and include evidence of engaging with the particular ICT Common Capability suppliers to ensure the scope of the offering doesn’t fit within the agency’s requirements.

The GCIO is keen to support agencies to take-up ICT Common Capabilities and to understand agency needs. If there is a legitimate reason an offering isn’t right for an agency, an exemption may be justified. However, there may also be an opportunity to enhance existing service catalogues to ensure the ICT Common Capability can be used appropriately. The GCIO will discuss all options with you.

More information can be found in the on the page Working with the GCIO.

 

6.  How do ICT Common Capabilities get prioritised?

Government agencies’ Four-Year Plans and Information System Strategy Plans outline ICT investment intentions. Where multiple agencies have common investment needs, these inform our development and prioritisation of ICT Common Capabilities.

Also, the actions in the Government ICT Strategy and Action Plan to 2017 are reviewed each year. This process ensures the ICT Common Capabilities are prioritised.

 

7. What do agencies do if they need something that isn’t an ICT Common Capability?

Please contact gcio@dia.govt.nz to find out if another agency has implemented a solution for a similar need. We would be happy to connect you. 

 

8. How do agencies find out what ICT Common Capabilities will be developed in the near future?

Common Capabilities under development are outlined in the 'Coming soon' section of this site. If you’d like to find out more about new common capabilities, please contact gcio@dia.govt.nz

 

9.   What happens if an agency needs something urgently that is still in the pipeline?

Please contact gcio@dia.govt.nz  as soon as possible. We can let you know if there is something in development and what the timelines are. 

If the timelines aren’t suitable then we encourage you to ensure you have an ‘off-ramp’ in any service contracts you sign. This will enable you to take up and benefit from the ICT Common Capability when it is ready for use.

If the ICT Common Capability you need hasn’t made it to the project stage yet, talk to us about who else may have the same requirements. It’s possible that your requirement could turn into a project that will develop the capacity you need.

Contact us to discuss the options.

 

10.  How can agencies get involved in an ICT Common Capability project?

Contact us on gcio@dia.govt.nz and we can put you in touch with the lead agency and help you get started.

If we are the lead agency we can talk you through the process. You may be an ideal candidate to get involved in customer advisory or governing groups for ICT Common Capabilities being developed. These groups help shape the scope and direction of offerings being developed for all-of-government.

 

11. Can any agency lead an ICT Common Capability project?

Yes. The GCIO can assist agencies in developing common market requirements and engaging with reference groups to determine the common attributes that will benefit other agencies. Contact us on gcio@dia.gov.nz to discuss.

 

12.  How can my agency contribute to future ICT Common Capabilities?

For future capabilities, consider your long-term requirement when you are developing your strategic investment plans and discuss with your sector partners how you can align your strategic thinking and leverage common capabilities.

Several ICT Common Capabilities are currently in the project stage and will be available for agencies in the near future. You can get involved in this stage by joining customer advisory or governing groups. These groups help shape the scope and direction of offerings being developed for all-of-government. Contact the project managers listed on the ‘Coming soon’ page to see how you can become involved.

 

13.  What is the secondary procurement process?

The secondary procurement process is the way an agency selects a vendor from an existing panel. The agency goes through a requirements selection process with the panel providers. This process is simpler than a full procurement process, which has already been conducted to determine the service provider panel for all-of- government use.

The general process is:

  1. Contact the product manager for the ICT Common Capability you require
  2. Sign a standard confidentiality agreement so all vendor catalogues can be released
  3. Select a vendor based on your business requirements
  4. Sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Internal Affairs as Lead Agency. This MoU sets out each party’s rights and obligations.
  5. Sign an agreement with the preferred supplier
  6. Once all agreements are agreed the supplier will transition the service

The requirements selection process will depend on the Common Capability being implemented, so please contact the Product Manager listed for that capability, for more detail.

 

14.  How do agencies get started using an ICT Common Capability?

The first step is to contact the product manager listed for the Common Capability you’re interested in implementing. They will be able to talk you through the secondary procurement process.

A good place to begin the discussion is with your business requirements including your operating model, security requirements and available resources. Having a thorough understanding of your requirements will make it easier to select a provider from the approval panel. The product manager will be able to provide specific guidance.

 

 15.  What is the service fee?

The lead agency charges a service fee to recover its expenses for developing, procuring, managing and reviewing Common Capability products. The lead agency not only invests their own resources into developing and procuring the products on behalf of all agencies but also takes responsibility for ensuring the contracts are well managed and the products remain relevant throughout the lifecycle. This takes ongoing time and resources.

The service fee is cost-recovery only and the amount will depend on the product.

Even with the service fee, taking up a Common Capability represents significant long-term savings to agencies. Agencies will no longer need to undertake their own full-scale procurement process and resources will be freed up to concentrate on developing better public services for citizens.

Please contact the product manager listed for the common capability being implemented for more detail on the service fees.

 

16.  What transition support will my agency get when we take up an ICT Common Capability?

Agencies taking up ICT Common Capabilities need to manage their own change processes. These processes need to be figured into all transition plans. Internal Affairs product managers are available to provide support and guidance.

 

17.   How do agencies get their preferred supplier on an ICT Common Capabilities panel?

Please ask your supplier to keep an eye on the Government Electronic Tenders Service (GETS) website for details on upcoming opportunities to supply information and proposals for ICT Common Capabilities. Tenders for all ICT Common Capabilities are posted on GETS.

 

18.  What happens when contracts are renewed/renegotiated and the supplier agencies may be using for an ICT Common Capability isn’t extended/renewed?

The Department of Internal Affairs, as lead agency, manages the product portfolio and contracts for all-of-government ICT Common Capabilities. If the membership of a vendor panel will be changing, we’ll provide transition planning support and advice.

 

19.  Why does it take so long to develop a Common Capability?

It takes time to develop an ICT Common Capability because this usually involves the simplification of complex ICT service catalogues, working with multiple agencies and stakeholders to define the Common Capability requirements and then a robust and comprehensive procurement process.

Page last updated: 06/12/2016